Tribal Home Visiting Awards $3.7 Million to Tribal Grantees through the American Rescue Plan

September 17, 2021

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, through the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, announced the award of approximately $3.7 million in supplemental funds to the 23 existing Tribal MIECHV grantees on September 4, 2021. These funds are a direct result of American Rescue Plan (ARP) funding passed to support recovery efforts of tribes in the United States.

Tribal MIECHV grants are designed to:

  • Develop and strengthen tribal capacity to support and promote the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) families.
  • Improve understanding of which home visiting approaches support improved health, well-being, and school readiness for young children and families in tribal communities.
  • Support and strengthen cooperation and linkages between programs that service American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families. 

“As a mother myself I know how important it is to have support, and it is especially critical right now during a global health crisis," said Michelle Sauve, acting commissioner for ACF’s Administration for Native Americans. “Home visiting is about supporting parents which in turn aids the next seven generations that will keep our Indigenous nations thriving. Tribal home visiting funds do more than just support a family unit, they also support that community's approach to nurturing the next generation.”  

“This administration is strongly committed to supporting the health, education, and well-being of young American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families,” said Katie Hamm, deputy assistant secretary of ACF’s Office of Early Childhood Development. “These ARP supplements provide Tribal MIECHV programs an unprecedented opportunity to meet the needs of their families and programs as they weather and recover from the pandemic. We look forward to partnering with Tribal MIECHV programs as they creatively leverage these funds to expand and enhance their services and engage with their communities to support young children and families.”

Tribal MIECHV programs are part of the broader Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Visit disclaimer page program, an initiative that supports states, territories, and tribal entities to implement evidence-based home visiting models to support expectant families and families with children from birth to kindergarten entry. Information about the systematic review that identifies models demonstrating effectiveness in improving outcomes is available at the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness website, https://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/ Visit disclaimer page .

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Tribal MIECHV programs have provided critical services to Native families and communities. An animated infographic about Tribal MIECHV activities in 2020 is available at: https://youtu.be/RFuud9IKajU Visit disclaimer page . The Tribal MIECHV ARP supplements will enhance programs’ continued efforts to meet the needs of young children and families.

Supplements were made at 30.8 percent of the current award for every grant, a significant new investment to support Tribal MIECHV programs and the families they serve. The goals of the MIECHV ARP funding are to increase the number of at-risk families receiving home visiting services during the pandemic and to ensure that current and additional families can obtain necessities.

Funds can be used for provision of home visiting services. This includes virtual visits, staff costs (including hazard pay), professional development supporting virtual home visiting, the purchase of technology for families to participate in virtual home visits, the purchase of emergency supplies like diapers, formula, food, and cleaning products, and prepaid grocery cards for families. These enhanced supports are expected to be incredibly meaningful for Native families and communities.

Grantee amounts are as follows:

Grantee

State

Amount

Native American Health Center, Inc.

Calif.

 $       174,020.00

Taos Pueblo Central Management Systems

N.M.

 $       100,100.00

United Indians of All Tribes Foundation

Wash.

 $       178,640.00

Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health, Inc.

Calif.

 $       231,000.00

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

N.C.

 $       192,500.00

South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency

Wash.

 $       184,800.00

Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe

Wash.

 $       130,900.00

Lake County Tribal Health Consortium, Inc.

Calif.

 $       157,696.00

Pueblo of San Felipe

N.M.

 $       107,800.00

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Okla.

 $       192,500.00

Native American Professional Parent Resources, Inc.

N.M.

 $       206,360.00

Southcentral Foundation

Alaska

 $       255,640.00

Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians

N.D.

 $       114,884.00

Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

Mont.

 $       138,600.00

White Earth Band of Chippewa Indians

Minn.

 $       172,480.00

Native American Community Health Center, Inc

Ariz.

 $       163,240.00

The Navajo Nation

Ariz.

 $       130,900.00

Crow Creek Tribal Schools

S.D.

 $         92,400.00

Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.

Alaska

 $       184,800.00

Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board

S.D.

 $       111,639.53

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Okla.

 $       133,980.00

Fairbanks Native Association

Alaska

 $       123,643.21

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan

Mich.

 $       245,857.92

Total

 $   3,724,380.66

Quick Facts

  • $3.7 million in supplemental funds awrded to the 23 existing Tribal MIECHV grantees on September 4, 2021.
  • The Tribal MIECHV ARP supplements will enhance programs’ continued efforts to meet the needs of young children and families.
  • Funds can be used for provision of home visiting services and are expected to be incredibly meaningful for Native families and communities.

Quotes

“As a mother myself I know how important it is to have support, and it is especially critical right now during a global health crisis. Home visiting is about supporting parents which in turn aids the next seven generations that will keep our Indigenous nations thriving. Tribal home visiting funds do more than just support a family unit, they also support that community's approach to nurturing the next generation.”
— Michelle Sauve, acting commissioner for ACF’s Administration for Native Americans
“This administration is strongly committed to supporting the health, education, and well-being of young American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families. These ARP supplements provide Tribal MIECHV programs an unprecedented opportunity to meet the needs of their families and programs as they weather and recover from the pandemic. We look forward to partnering with Tribal MIECHV programs as they creatively leverage these funds to expand and enhance their services and engage with their communities to support young children and families.”
— Katie Hamm, deputy assistant secretary of ACF’s Office of Early Childhood Development

Contact

Administration for Children & Families
Office of Communications
330 C Street, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20201

Phone: (202) 401-9215
Fax: (202) 205-9688
Email: media@acf.hhs.gov